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20130117
20130125
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> i love watching them interact. i love watching joe biden all the time, but watching the first family. >> he's chewing something. is that nick korette? >> i mom used to love diahann carroll because she said that's the way a black pom should be p portrayed. michelle obama is so iconic. she's the combination of the woman next door but such a style icon and a jackie o. figure for african-americans. watching her interact with the kids. watching this family that are at once so normal but in a way sort of grand. they are sort of kennedy-like. i just love it and i just love watching it and to people i have spoken with that are here are so consumed. african-americans are so proud of -- >> i think this is one of the most important legacies of the obama presidency, that visual images are so powerful. >> look at him right now. >> so see an african-american family charmingly filling the roles of head of state, first family of the united states. to see them walk across the white house lawn and get on the helicopter to go to camp david or to see them there in the reviewing stand and watch the girls
president joe biden. we're all part of this. they were shouting we're in this together and we're going to act together and we're going to try to open dialogue with those who would be our enemies abroad. we're not looking for another war this time and under this president we're looking for a way to avoid one. because these wars as we've all learned the hard way are a lot easier to start than to finish. let's start with this astounding presidential embrace of the ongoing american revolution from lexington and concord to seneca falls, selma, and stonewall. sam stein covers politics for "the huffington post," and stephanie schriock is president of emily's list. let's start with the message of inclusion and community in the president's address yesterday. many have noticed his preference for three iconic places with historic significance in the fight for american rights. let me run through them. first, seneca falls, new york, where in 1848 elizabeth cady stanton and others led a historic convention dedicated to women's rights which later led to a women's right to vote, of course. selma, alab
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)